Static Apnea Tables…

Static Apnea Tables are mostly used by freedivers to increase the amount of time they can stay underwater on one breath of air. I started doing these because freediving is on my bucket list but before i learned to freedive i had to learn to swim, then once i learned to swim i thought, i don’t want to do freediving at the moment, i want to do extreme triathlons.

But i kept static apnea tables in my training arsenal as it’s also thought that practising static apnea tables increases levels of erythropoietin (EPO) and will improve other areas of fitness and wellbeing by making one’s body carry and use more oxygen more efficiently in a totally natural way.

And one can also look at static apnea practice as a meditation that allows one a view into one’s body and mind that one doesn’t get any other way. And it’s a very interesting view. Breathing is an incredibly important part of living, and breathing well is an incredibly important beginning to living well. By practising static apnea when one wakes up every morning one can see the effects of changes to one’s lifestyle from the day before on the body through it’s need for oxygen. Try smoking cigarettes and doing these tables! Drink a cup of coffee and do them! Quit drinking tea, coffee and smoking cigarettes and see what difference it makes over the coming days and weeks.

Eventually, over time, one can take out of one’s lifestyle everything that is impeding one’s ability to breath properly and efficiently because one sees the direct effect of everything on their breathing through the tables.

My problem with these tables is Summer, yes, Summer. In Summer i just want to dive out of bed and get on with things so static apnea tables just get left behind, but once Winter comes i always get back into them again as they’re a great excuse to stay in a nice warm bed for another half hour. 😀

I use Unaerobic Plus, which i find to be a brilliant little app for this purpose.

I only do one table per day, either CO2 or O2, (depending on how much time i have spare as the O2 table takes a while longer to complete) with 8 cycles in each table!

Of course, we’re all different and our bodies behave differently and respond to training differently, so play around with things and see what works best for you, you may prefer 4 seconds in and 8 seconds out for example, maybe 7 or 9 cycles gives better results.

So my Winter 2016 times…

CO2 Table…

0:41 = 3 breaths – hold 1:30
0:41 = 3 breaths – hold 1:30
0:41 = 3 breaths – hold 1:30
0:41 = 3 breaths – hold 1:30
0:41 = 3 breaths – hold 1:30
0:41 = 3 breaths – hold 1:30
0:41 = 3 breaths – hold 1:30
0:41 = 3 breaths – hold 2:30

3 breaths are achieved with 5 seconds out, 5 seconds in, 10 seconds out, 5 seconds in, 10 seconds out, 6 seconds fully in. If you find yourself gasping for air at the end of a hold and not able to let the air out slowly over the first 5 seconds breath out then you’re holding too long, shorten the hold time until you can manage the first 5 seconds out breath easily.

I set the last hold time to 1 minute extra. If i can hold to 30 seconds extra then i increase all holds by 1 seconds, if i can hold to 1 minute extra i increase all holds by 2 seconds.

O2 Table…

2:11 = 9 breaths – hold 1:33
2:11 = 9 breaths – hold 1:43
2:11 = 9 breaths – hold 1:54
2:11 = 9 breaths – hold 2:05
2:11 = 9 breaths – hold 2:16
2:11 = 9 breaths – hold 2:28
2:11 = 9 breaths – hold 2:41
2:11 = 9 breaths – hold 2:54

If any hold is feeling easy then i add a second to that hold. If a hold feels difficult then just leave it as it is.

9 breaths are acheived with 5 seconds out, then 5 seconds in and 10 seconds out 8 times followed by 6 seconds in. If you find yourself gasping for air at the end of a hold and not able to let the air out slowly over the 5 seconds then you’re holding too long, shorten the hold time until you can manage the 5 seconds out breath.

Write a comment if you have any questions or comments about what i’m doing here.

Best wishes.